Breaches to Nixa's power supply not related to failed substation

NIXA, Mo. Nixa has been doing their best to keep power running until longtime repairs to a failed substation are made.

This weather hasn't been making it easy.

Brian Denney, Nixa's Electric Superintendent, said. "Usually when you have a big outage it's either a transformer blown or something big that you can see, no problem. These little blinks and quits is like finding a needle in a haystack."

That haystack is the city of Nixa. It's especially challenging for crews to find that needle.

"Very exhausting on the guys especially in weather like this," said Denney.

The problem was eventually isolated to one part of town, near the Tracker substation.

"We're running from the substation to the end of the line. It could be a half a mile long to a couple miles long. Then you're talking several pieces of equipment within that range. It can take forever," he said.

Once the blown circuit is found, crews have to see how widespread the problem is.

"Only thing we can do is just dry the line out, look at every pole, every cut out, every insulator, every piece of equipment on the pole and see if we can see something that's unusual or don't look right," said Denney.

The problems with the power this week aren't unheard of. However, some people may be concerned after the outages last summer.

"This happens two or three times a year. It has nothing to do with overloading of the circuits or anything like that. I know they're frustrated but it just happens. We haven't had much luck here lately this year with the Espy going down so I can definitely understand why they're getting frustrated," explained Denney.

There could still be more hiccups with the power supply in Nixa.

"We're crossing our fingers, hoping that's the problem but until it happens again we don't know," said Denney.

The city will continue to run with longer powerlines and three substations until the replacement for the failed substation is up and running.

Crews hope to have it up and running by April 1st.

Read the original version of this article at www.kspr.com.