New Drury cybersecurity degree combines business, computer science

If it hasn't happened to you, it's happened to someone you know. ID theft is the fastest growing crime in America. Last year alone more than nine million identities were stolen.

Starting this fall, Drury will launch a new degree program in cyber security. Here's how the university is trying to change the game, combining computer science and business.

Jacob Stauch is from Camdenton. He's grateful to stay in the Ozarks and study cybersecurity.

"What I would like to see is more companies understand from a business side, understand the real risk of leaving vulnerabilities open or not getting proper security research," he said.

Nico Sigloch is from Germany. He never thought he'd go into this field.

"I was not into computer science at all. I would never consider myself a tech guy or spending time on computers. Came in and took the first class and loved it from the beginning," he said.

A Bachelor of Business Administration in Cyber-Risk Management is a new approach to stay ahead of cyber criminals.

"One of the things we are working on right now is meeting with community leaders and thinking about how can we make Springfield a hub for cyber security education? This program is going to play a roll in that." said Dr. Shannon McMurtrey with Drury University.

Saying there's a high demand is really an understatement.

"Right now as we sit here are more than one million unfilled positions globally in the field of cybersecurity. That number is estimated to double within the next five years," said McMurtrey.

Starting pay for these jobs is more than $92,000 a year.