The Latest: 'Last Men' filmmakers make it to the Oscars


LOS ANGELES (AP) - The Latest on the Academy Awards, which are being bestowed Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood (all times local):

3:50 p.m.

Oscar nominees Richard Jenkins and Sam Rockwell are sharing in a little bromance on the Oscars red carpet.

When the best supporting actor nominees crossed paths on the carpet Sunday they didn't look at each other as wary rivals, instead engaging a warm bear hug of an embrace.

The 70-year-old Jenkins is nominated for his role as the reclusive neighbor who kindly lends his assistance to a sea creature being held by the government in "The Shape of Water."

Rockwell is also a supporting actor nominee for his role as the racist small-town sheriff's deputy who, following a fiery epiphany, attempts to help Frances McDormand find her daughter's killer in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri."

This is Rockwell's first Oscar nomination. Jenkins received a supporting actor nomination in 2009 for "The Visitor."

- Sandy Cohen (YouKnowSandy) and John C. Rogers


3:40 p.m.

There may not be a blackout dress code like there was at the Golden Globes, but Time's Up has remained a hot topic on the Oscars red carpet.

A few men flaunted their Time's Up pins again, like "The Greatest Showman" songwriter Justin Paul, Bradley Whitford and best supporting actor nominees Richard Jenkins and Sam Rockwell. "Get Out" actor Lil Rel Howery says his pin is on his jean jacket, which he wears out more often than his Oscars tux.

Eva Marie Saint, who is presenting Sunday night, says she thinks the movement will be good for men and women. Whitford says it's time to focus on non-Hollywood Time's Up situations too.

Tarana Burke, the creator of the viral #MeToo movement, walked the carpet Sunday with her sister. Burke says that it is still a joyous occasion and that they're at the Oscars to celebrate how much the movement has grown in less than six months.

Burke says they did the "dress code thing" and now they're doing the work.

- Nicole Evatt (NicoleEvatt) and Lindsey Bahr (ldbahr)


3:15 p.m.

World skiing champion Lindsey Vonn says her heart was racing faster on the Oscars red carpet than it did at the Olympics.

Vonn was one of the early arrivals Sunday for the 90th Academy Awards and says being there creates anxiety on a totally different level than racing down a ski slope.

The Olympic gold medalist and World Cup champion says she's excited to be around so many strong and powerful women who are presenting awards at Sunday's Oscars and plans to just soak in the evening's atmosphere.

Vonn says she also hopes the Time's Up movement can change world culture for both entertainment and sports figures.

- Nicole Evatt (NicoleEvatt) and Lindsey Bahr (ldbahr)


3:05 p.m.

Oscar nominee Diane Warren says she did not hesitate to stop to do an interview with E! host Ryan Seacrest on the Oscars red carpet Sunday.

Seacrest is facing allegations of sexual misconduct and there have been questions around whether Time's Up supporters will stop to talk to him on the carpet in spite of that. Seacrest has denied wrongdoing, and E! says it conducted an investigation and did find any issues with the host's conduct.

Warren says she knows Seacrest and has for a long time. She also says she's a big supporter of the Time's Up movement. Allison Janney, considered the front-runner for the best supporting actress Oscar, was among those who also spoke to Seacrest on Sunday.

Warren is nominated for best original song for "Stand Up for Something" from the film "Marshall."

Warren has been nominated for nine Oscars, and her previous nomination was for the song "Til It Happens to You" from "The Hunting Ground," a 2015 documentary about campus rape.

- Nicole Evatt (NicoleEvatt) and Lindsey Bahr (ldbahr)


2:55 p.m.

"Strong Island" director Yance Ford says that it has been an incredible experience being the first openly transgender nominee.

Ford's says Sunday that his presence on the Oscars red carpet speaks for itself and that he plans to enjoy himself no matter what the outcome when the envelope is opened later in the evening.

The film is a harrowing portrait of how Ford's family was affected following the death of his brother in 1992 in Long Island. A white grand jury did not indict the white man who shot him.

"Strong Island" is competing for best documentary against "Last Men in Aleppo," ''Icarus," ''Abacus: Small Enough to Jail" and "Faces Places."

- Nicole Evatt (NicoleEvatt) and Lindsey Bahr (ldbahr)


2:45 p.m.

With a little more than two hours to go until Oscar showtime, a sense of calm before the storm has set in backstage at the 90th annual Academy Awards.

Several show workers appear to be enjoying the respite, sitting backstage quietly chatting while one worker diligently wipes away smudges in preparation of celebrities' imminent arrival on the red carpet.

There is no mention of the stunning envelope fiasco that closed last year's show.

- Sandy Cohen (YouKnowSandy)


2:35 p.m.

"Last Men in Aleppo" director Firas Fayyad says that art is more powerful than the voices of Vladimir Putin or Donald Trump.

Fayyad's documentary about a group of first responders in the White Helmets and the Syrian civil war is nominated for best documentary at the 90th Academy Awards Sunday. The film is up against "Faces Places," ''Abacus: Small Enough to Jail," ''Icarus" and "Strong Island."

Fayyed said Sunday on the Oscars red carpet said that he is honored to be there and that it's an important space to share this story. He said it was one of the most powerful platforms in the world. He has been openly critical of Russia and Putin while promoting the film.

The filmmakers had faced some visa issues and were unsure if they were going to make it to the Oscars, but access came through for Fayyed, his producer and his cinematographer. Syria is one of the countries included in a travel ban.

- Nicole Evatt (NicoleEvatt) and Lindsey Bahr (ldbahr)


1:30 p.m.

It's an hour before the stars start arriving on the Oscars red carpet, and final preparations are in full swing.

E! red carpet host Giuliana Rancic posed for photos in front of fan bleachers wearing a flowing yellow dress. Journalists worked to get into their positions on the carpet, some snapping their last selfies before the show. The carpet is scheduled to open at 5:30 p.m. Eastern.

Fans cheered as they recorded a well-wishes message to host Jimmy Kimmel, who returns as Oscars host for the second time.

Two workers from Wolfgang Puck's restaurant carried a huge tray of food that will be served inside the post-show Governors Ball, including chocolates and lox shaped like Oscars statuettes. Puck followed the platter, throwing snacks to cheering fans in the bleachers and saying, "Alright, who wants an Oscar?"

A massive tent was erected over the carpet to protect it from two days of rain. But the skies had cleared Sunday and temperatures were the low 60s, although it was considerably hotter for fans and journalists under the tent.


6 a.m.

The (right) envelope, please.

The Oscars will hope to live down their most infamous blunder at the 90th Academy Awards. The ceremony begins at 8 p.m. EST. But more than redemption is on the line Sunday. The ceremony promises to be rife with references to the #MeToo movement sparked by the Harvey Weinstein revelations.

Host Jimmy Kimmel will be tasked with not just ensuring the correct winners are read Sunday, but also with confronting a traumatic year for Hollywood. No dress-code protest is planned by Time's Up organizers, as happened at January's Golden Globes.

The night's top honor, best picture, is considered especially up for grabs this year, with contenders including "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri," ''The Shape of Water" and "Get Out."

- AP Film Writer Jake Coyle (jakecoyleAP)