Missouri State University raising tuition, other student fees for upcoming school year

Published: Apr. 20, 2022 at 8:10 PM CDT
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SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) - Missouri State University students will soon pay the most significant tuition increase in the last decade.

The Board of Governors Executive Committee approved the fee schedule for the 2022-2023 school year. President Clif Smart says the overall tuition increase is less than 4%.

On the Springfield campus:

For undergraduate students who are Missouri residents, tuition will go up by $10 per credit hour.

For undergraduate students who are out-of-state residents, tuition will go up by $22 per credit hour.

For graduate students who are Missouri residents, tuition will go up by $13 per credit hour.

For graduate students who are out-of-state residents, tuition will go up by $25 per credit hour.

On the West Plains campus:

For undergraduate students who are Missouri residents, tuition will go up by $5 per credit hour.

For undergraduate students who are out-of-state residents, tuition will go up by $10 per credit hour.

Sophomore Jessica Chapman says the cost of school is already high, on top of other expenses.

“Looking at grocery prices, gas prices, just everything pretty much going up as we see,” Chapman says. “Me getting to be an upperclassman, I’m obviously not going to live on campus forever. I’m going to be living in an apartment. I’m going to have bills to pay and this and that.”

Chapman says she already has a job to cover some of the costs.

”Being like a working student, that’s kind of hard to balance work, school, and just home life in general,” Chapman says. “It’s hard to balance everything being a full-time student. Prices going up is going to encourage students to work more, which is more time that we can’t focus on school.”

Smart says the increase in costs for students is partially due to inflation driving up costs for the university.

On top of that, the labor shortage is driving up the wages needed to hire workers, while the school also focuses on retaining the staff members it already has.

“We’re working to put together on the FY ‘23 budget, per your direction, a 4% across the board pay increase,” Smart says.

Residence hall housing fees are also going up. It’s dependent on the hall you live in, but none of the increases will be higher than 6%.

Smart blames the rising cost of food.

“The only other option in terms of this increase is to scale back and close a dining hall for periods of time or provide lesser quality food, and I don’t think either of those is good options,” Smart says.

For Freshman Alex Hill, he wishes the school had decided this earlier.

That would have allowed working students more time to prepare financially.

“I’m already working half the time to help pay for it myself, so schoolwork balance is already hard enough,” Hill says. “I’m just a little worried. I don’t know.”

The cost of parking permits will also increase, which is a significant cause of concern for students.

“Parking already is not the best situation on campus. I’d say,” Chapman says. “We do pay quite a bit for a parking pass that I feel like is a struggle to use most of the time, so that also is something I feel students would worry about as an extra cost.”

Smart says the increased fees for parking permits will pay for the maintenance of parking lots on campus.

More information on the fee schedule for the upcoming year can be found here.

The new fees go into effect on July 1.

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