Calls requiring ambulance services increasing in the Ozarks

Springfield hospitals report increased calls requesting help. Calls where an ambulance is needed, have increased by 6%. The rise in demand is leading to some ch
Published: Sep. 6, 2022 at 5:11 AM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) - Springfield hospitals report increased calls requesting help. Calls where an ambulance is needed, have increased by 6%. The rise in demand is leading to some changes.

“I would have to say just in my opinion, during COVID during the pandemic, I think a lot of people were scared of what’s coming and potentially getting COVID,” said Darren Bass, Vice President of Clinical Services. “I think some preventative things may have been delayed or may have been put off, and we’re seeing that people are sick, and they’re very sick right now. And so I think that is leading to some increased calls. You know, as well as overall, I think our population continues to increase in this area. And as people continue to move here, we’re going to see an uptick in calls.”

Ambulances will no longer be present at football games to free up those resources, but that’s just part of the strategy. Administrators use software tracking historical hot spots where ambulances are frequently dispatched. Then ambulances are placed near those hot spots to respond to an emergency quickly.

“As 911 calls come in, we can see which ambulances are in the best location to get to that call quickly,” said Bass. “We use some strategies, over time we see certain areas that are busier than others during certain times of the day such as commuting to traffic, you know commuting into and out of work. We can position ambulances using historical information to be in areas that typically see higher call volumes where accidents and things like that.”

One way administrators make sure emergency care is available is by placing ambulances around town where there is a high volume of calls. The strategy allows EMTs to avoid high traffic and helps keep response time down.

“I just want our communities to be reassured that we handle situations we hand spikes and volumes, whether it’s EMS, whether it’s in the emergency department wherever we pull our team together and we meet the need,” said Bass. “We are here for the communities we serve. We do have a partnership with Mercy in the Springfield area where we each have designated territories, but you know, we understand that we’re both busy, and sometimes we have to help each other out.”

Bass says that while calls are up, there is no shortage of EMTs ready to provide care. He credits the hospital’s partnership with Springfield College for providing enough trained professionals to keep ambulances staffed.

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com