Could local honey help you this allergy season?

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SPRINGFIELD, Mo. Those beautiful flowers mean that allergy season is here. And a late start to spring weather means that there's a wider variety of allergens than usual.

Dr. Minh-Thu Le, an allergist-immunologist with Cox in Springfield said, "Usually we would be into grass season now, and we are seeing grass, but also the trees are still up, so it might be a lot worse for people because grass is here and still really high."

But it's not just plants that are causing a problem.

"We've had more rain too recently, so the mold counts have continued to be high and that's something that if you're allergic to mold on top of your seasonal allergies, you're going to have a lot more problems."

And this has several people turning to natural remedies like local honey to help.

Christina Shellhart with Half Crocked Honeys, sells local honey at area farmers markets. She makes sure that the honey and pollen from her products is within 50 miles.

"I've been doing this for 5 years in this area and people have raved about it. Anything I think that nature, you're not messing with, you just can't get better than that," Shellhart said.

The thought behind this is that local honey contains local pollen, allowing you to slowly build up an immunity to what you're allergic to.
This strategy is very similar to an allergy shot. But, some allergists are skeptical whether that's enough to stop the sniffling and sneezing.

" With bee pollen or bee honey, we have no idea how much is in there, and there's probably not enough in there to make that big of a difference. But if you like honey, and you want to eat it, that's fine. I just wouldn't expect it to do much with your allergies," Dr. Le said.

If you're looking for another natural way to battle pollen this spring, start by washing your clothes and showering after being outside to rinse away the pollen. Some doctors also believe taking probiotics will provide a natural boost your immune health.