Leigh's Lost and Found: what to do if you find a litter of newborn kittens

In our Leigh's Lost and Found today, what to do if you come across a litter of newborn kittens in the wild.

We see that happen on the Lost and Found facebook page at least a couple of times a week. People find a litter of tiny kittens and don't know what to do. So we went to a local cat rescue to find out.

There's not much cuter than newborn kittens, but they are a ton of work.

"Especially for little, tiny babies. Honestly, these babies need to be fed every three hours."

Marci Bowling with Watching Over Whiskers cat rescue, has done her fair share of feeding.

She took a litter in just over a week ago after someone found them, alone, at a Springfield park with no mom in sight.

"We tell people not to panic at first. A lot of times, mom is off eating, or hunting and gathering. Or she's going to the neighbor's house who is feeding her."

Marci says if you can, leave any kittens alone for six to eight hours to see if a mama cat comes back.

"When moms and babies that little are separated, the likelihood of their survival goes down greatly."

But if mom's a no show and the kittens look in danger.

"You're going to want to scoop them up and you're going to need to get some syringes and formula and begin feeding them."

Marci has her kitten foster families then follow tips from Kittenlady.org. Everything from how and when to feed them, bathe them, keep them warm and even stimulate them to use the bathroom.

"It's perfect for anyone to use who finds them and is navigating in the dark on how to help care for them."

If that's just too much work for you, you can try reaching out to rescues like W.O.W. who rely on foster families.

"Without foster, these little babies wouldn't be here."

It may be tiring, but Marci says it's more than rewarding to know you've played a part in making sure these little babies make it long enough to grow up and find forever homes.

If you're interested in fostering for Watching Over Whiskers, click on the related link to contact them.

Read the original version of this article at www.kspr.com.