Missouri voters say yes to medical marijuana

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A ballot measure allowing the use of medical marijuana with an emphasis on helping veterans has passed, but two other medical marijuana measures were turned down.

Missouri voters on Tuesday approved Amendment 2, a ballot measure backed by a coalition of patients, doctors and veterans called New Approach Missouri. It was one of three unrelated medical marijuana measures on the ballot.

Under Amendment 2, post-traumatic stress disorder is among the conditions that qualify for use of medical marijuana, along with cancer and other serious illnesses. A 4 percent sales tax will go to a newly-created fund for health and care services for veterans. The sales tax revenue also will be used to administer licensing of medical marijuana businesses.

Voters turned down Amendment 3, which would have included a 15 percent tax to create a new state institute to research "presently incurable diseases." The effort was largely self-funded by Springfield doctor and attorney Brad Bradshaw.

Also defeated was Proposition C, which would have imposed a 2 percent tax on the sale of medical marijuana.