SURPRISE: Snake slithers into photographer's home, helps father teach children lesson on snakes

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Mo. -- According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, Missouri is home to 47 species and subspecies of snakes. 88 percent of them are harmless. One family near Mountain View, Mo. knows that all to well after their recent encounter with not one, but two huge black snakes.

Phillip Haumesser was about to leave work last week, when he got a call from his wife at home.

"She was frantic, screaming and yelling. I couldn't tell what was going on. I was concerned somebody got hurt," Haumesser told KY3.

She and the couple's three children were fine, well sort of.

"I finally got her to calm down, she was saying there's a black in the house. She was saying its huge," he exclaimed.

Phillip got home and searched for the snake.

He found it in his children's bedroom.

"And it kind of startled me, because it stretched about half the length of the room. It ended up being about six and a half feet long," he added.

The family thinks the snake slithered in through an open back door.

Little did the snake know, it had made its way into a photographer's home.

So Phillip and the family went out back to take some incredible pictures and learn a thing or two about snakes.

"I was explaining to the kids, letting them touch it and what not, explaining to them we don't just pick up any old snake, he explained. A lot of snakes are poisonous. Some snakes are good to have around, these are one of the good ones. I told the don't ever just pick one up, come find mom and dad if you find a snake."

Then, comes snake number two.

Much to his wife's surprise.

"As I'm explaining that to the kids, my wife is coming around, going back into the house and she starts screaming again. I come around and there's another black snake, bigger than the first one. It ended up being about seven feet long. Right here, probably headed back in the back door, which was open again," he noted.

Currently, the family has several chickens on the property.

The smell of the duck eggs and chicken eggs is what likely is attracting the harmless snakes.

Haumesser says a mother duck has visited the home the past two years and laid eggs underneath the ramp leading to the home's front deck.

"With this being a great experience with kids; yes there are a lot of things that are dangerous but I want them to be aware of it. I always say when I'm teaching, that experience is the best teacher. I would rather them experience this first hand in a safer environment, then experience it without experience and end up getting hurt," Haumesser said.

The snakes were released in the woods behind the home.

The family's days of snake catching are likely just beginning.