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Springfield sailor saves young man's life

 Courtesy: U.S. Navy
Courtesy: U.S. Navy (KY3)
Published: Jun. 9, 2020 at 4:22 PM CDT
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Every Navy sailor is trained to respond to life-threatening situations, from basic first aid to emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); on the ship out at sea there are no ambulances or fire fighters to call. Each sailor is a first responder, receiving continuous training until it all becomes muscle memory.

On his usual route home on June 3, Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class Dylan Bryant, native of Springfield, Missouri, a recruiter assigned to Navy Talent Acquisition Group Philadelphia, suddenly needed to put the life-saving skills he learned in the Navy to use.

As he was pulling into his apartment complex at Springfield Farms, Bryant noticed an oddly parked vehicle with two men standing near. Like any good motorist assuming it was car troubles, Bryant pulled over and asked if he could offer any assistance.

“I rolled down my window and asked them if everything was okay,” recounted Bryant. “After they both shook their heads ‘no,’ I asked if there was anything I could do to help when one of them looked up and asked me: ‘Do you know CPR?’”

What Bryant didn’t see initially, was a young man, unconscious and breathless, lying on the other side of the vehicle, while his friend, a girl named Kiyana, was trying her best to revive him. In that instant the training, that muscle memory kicked in.

“As soon as I heard ‘Do you know CPR?’ I threw my car in park and ran to the other side of the vehicle,” said Bryant. “I asked her [Kiyana] to step aside and informed her I was CPR qualified, and I would do everything I could to help.”

He continued CPR for 5 or 6 minutes until the local fire department and emergency medical technicians arrived on the scene.

“The entire 5 - 6 minutes seemed like the longest time in my life, as I was trying to keep count of the compressions in my head, and alternating with the breaths,” recalled Bryant. “Later EMTs told me that if I hadn't performed the CPR when I did, he may not have made it through.”

As EMTs took over, the young man regained consciousness, and Bryant learned his name - Dominique. Bryant doesn’t know what caused the man to become unresponsive, nor which hospital he was taken to, but he feels honored to have been able to render much needed aid and save Dominique’s life.

“Something that Bryant said to me just stuck out, he simply said: ‘I was just in the right place at the right time’,” said Chief Electronics Technician Sean Jenkins, Bryant’s leading chief petty officer at Navy Recruiting Station Hagerstown. “But that’s just the type of person he really is, he wants to make sure that everyone around him is doing well and everyone is ok. I am glad that he was ‘in the right place, at the right time,’ because when you save a life, you are not just saving that one life, you are saving every life that that person has touched.”

NTAG Philadelphia encompasses regions of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and West Virginia, providing recruiting services from more than 30 talent acquisition sites with the overall goal of attracting the highest quality candidates to ensure the ongoing success of America’s Navy.

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