Vandalism on Confederate monument at Springfield National Cemetery

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Springfield, Mo. -- A Confederate monument vandalized today at the Springfield National Cemetery.

A large amount of red paint was thrown on a part of the monument honoring a Confederate Major General.

Vandals hit early in the morning between shifts of security guards.

The National Cemetery recently contacted the Greene County Sheriff's office, concerned about vandalism on Confederate monuments across the nation.

The Sheriff had supplied an off-duty security guard, to relieve the guard contracted through a private security firm.

The vandalism was discovered by a citizen and reported to the deputy.

Workers spent the day trying to get rid of the paint, but not before some upset visitors showed up to see the vandalism for themselves.

"It's upsetting it makes you shake a little bit you know because it's just our history," Bill Hendrix said. "I mean what else can you do besides cry for the people who did it."

"These were American Soldiers too," Dale Wrenn, Camp Commander, with Springfield Sons of Confederate Veterans, said. "They're due every right and privilege as any other American soldier."

Visitors, one with family buried in the cemetery, see the vandalism as an attack on history and family.

"You've got family that's buried here, I've got a grandpa that's fought as a confederate and you know it's just you've got to understand those were uncles, nieces, nephews fighting each other not a good will to our society and America," Hendrix said.

"Oh, I knew it was bound to happen, it just was a matter of time," Wrenn said. "But where does all of this end?"

The Greene County Sheriff's Office said despite the difference in national opinion, vandalism is still a crime.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs said Destruction and defacement of federal property is a serious crime.

The investigation is ongoing and anyone with information is asked to call the Greene County Sheriff's Office.